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Posted by on July 4, 2012.

Dunwoody 4th of July Parade marches again

Will Frame, 9, of Cub Scout Pack 266 waves flags as he marches in front of the Dunwoody 4th of July Parade.

Dunwoody’s annual celebration of America’s birthday looks like something Norman Rockwell would’ve painted.

The two-mile parade route along Mount Vernon Road was a landscape of bright reds, solid blues, booming patriotic music, sincere faces and smiling children.

The parade’s organizers claim it is the largest in the state, drawing 2,500 participants and 32,000 spectators last year. That’s a hard claim to dispute, but even if you could find one that compares, it would be hard to match the city’s earnestness and spirit.

American values were as much on display as the barbecue and brochures at the tents at the end of the parade route.

Amid division, there was unity.

The Dunwoody City Council, currently at odds over alleged ethics violations, put their differences aside and rode together in a small golf cart, each flashing a wide grin.

On a route lined with the city’s busiest retail businesses, a group of young men practiced the American virtues of entrepreneurship and charity.

Matthew Coody, his brother Chandler and his friend Will Gillett served up snow cones and cotton candy. They were fattening their wallets, but also planned set aside 20 percent of the proceeds for a worthy cause.

They hadn’t yet made up their minds, but were leaning toward giving money to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

“Village Burger is donating the space to us,” Gillett said. “They said we should donate to charity.”

See photos from the event below:

Hayden Gore, 3, right, Oliver Janke, 3, middle, and Madison Thieleke, 3, left, play near the Dunwoody 4th of July Parade route.

Dunwoody Parade Grand Marshall Ken Wright, the former mayor.

Attendees of the Dunwoody 4th of July Parade stake out their positions along the parade route.

The Dunwoody City Council rides together in the city’s annual 4th of July parade. It’s a display of unity for a council that has recently been divided by charges of ethics violations. Councilwoman Adrian Bonser, seen on the back of the golf cart, recently accused her fellow council members of violating the city’s ethics law after some of the council members accused her of doing the same.

Matthew Coody, right, his brother Chandler, middle, and their friend Will Gillett man a snow cone and cotton candy stand along the route of the Dunwoody 4th of July Parade. Coody, who describes himself as an entrepreneur, pledged to donate 20 percent of proceeds to charity.

Matthew Coody swirls cotton candy along the route of the Dunwoody 4th of July Parade. Coody, who describes himself as an entrepreneur, pledged to donate 20 percent of proceeds to charity.

Members of the Dunwoody Chamber of Commerce march in the city’s annual 4th of July Parade.

A Black Hawk helicopter lands at the Dunwoody 4th of July parade. Security officials reported one person received a minor injury from the debris the chopper stirred up, but the person declined to be taken to the hospital.

The U.S. Army band marches in the Dunwoody 4th of July Parade.

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