The idea of a new 5-acre park beneath the Dunwoody MARTA Station’s elevated tracks drew praise from residents and officials when it was unveiled at a public meeting in April 2014. Someone at Google Maps got excited enough to add the dream park to the company’s Perimeter Center map.

2014-5-16 - Park Concept 2.psd

A final design for the Perimeter Park @ Dunwoody MARTA Station provided by the Perimeter Center Improvement Districts.

But two years later, “Perimeter Park @ Dunwoody MARTA Station” remains a paper park. A final design was chosen, apparently in late 2014, by the Perimeter Center Improvement Districts.

But the park remains on the drawing board with no schedule for completion.

“We are researching funding sources [and] options and working with the city of Dunwoody and Perimeter Mall…on the transfer of the land, but there is no timeline for this,” said PCIDs External Affairs Director Tammy Thompson.

Perimeter Park would be a redevelopment of a fenced-off strip of trees along a wide concrete drainage ditch just north of the MARTA station and extending to the Perimeter Station shopping center. The area is bordered by Perimeter Center Parkway to the west and the back end of Perimeter Mall to the east.

The park was the brainchild of PCIDs, with the city of Dunwoody willing to maintain it as part of the city park system. PCIDs commissioned designs from the consulting firm Kimley-Horn and Associates, which were unveiled at Dunwoody City Hall meetings in spring of 2014.

The designs generally called for turning the ditch into more of a stream with landscaped banks, along with bridges across the water and an open, pedestrian-friendly connection between Perimeter Center Parkway and the mall’s loop road.

There also was talk of illuminating the MARTA track pillars with decorative lighting.

Two alternative designs had different options for the area immediately north of the MARTA station. One was a grassy “great lawn” design and the other had a pond that doubled as stormwater management.

The final design selected by PCIDs went with the grassy option, showing two circular lawns with seating areas. The design is dated November 2014, but Thompson could not confirm exactly when it was approved.

During the 2014 meetings, PCIDs president and CEO Yvonne Williams said the park’s land—partly on mall property and partly in city of Dunwoody right of way—could be acquired at no cost. But, she said, construction would be done as money became available.

However, not even the land acquisition is worked out yet, according to PCIDs and the city of Dunwoody.

0Shares