“Welcome to Brookhaven.”

Those were Mayor John Ernst’s words to residents from the Woodcliff Drive area that were annexed into the city in a unanimous vote from the City Council at its Dec. 13 meeting.

The area residents have petitioned to be annexed by Brookhaven is located in the small yellow area at the very bottom of the map. (City of Brookhaven)

The area residents have petitioned to be annexed by Brookhaven is located in the small yellow area at the very bottom of the map. Click to enlarge. (City of Brookhaven)

The residential area covering about 19 acres and located adjacent to the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Office Park adds about 200 people living in townhomes and condominiums to the city’s nearly 52,000 residents.

The annexation is effective Jan. 1.

The annexation petition was submitted to the city in October by residents living in the Executive Park Townhomes on Woodcliff Drive and residents living in Executive Park Apartments on Briarcliff Road, the Executive Park Condominiums on Executive Park Lane and two single-family homes at 1705 and 1721 Woodcliff Drive N.E. The total annexation area is approximately 19 acres and includes nearly 200 people.

The single-family homes have been purchased by Minerva Homes who plans to redevelop the property into nine townhomes valued at $450,000 to $500,000.

The city is expected to pull in about $30,000 a year in taxes from the residents and there is no significant cost with police protection or public works, according to the city.

“Geographically, we already feel like we are a part of the city,” said Rick Bennett, HOA president for Executive Park Townhomes, in his presentation to the council.

Rick Bennett, HOA president for ..., sits in a brick wall behind his Executive Parkview townhome that is located in DeKalb County. The trees behind him are in the Brookhaven city limits. (Photo Dyana Bagby)

Rick Bennett sits on a brick wall behind his Executive Parkview townhouse that is located in DeKalb County. The trees behind him are in the Brookhaven city limits. (Photo Dyana Bagby)

Bennett said the residents wanted to be annexed by the city because of its “exceptional” police force and the way the city responds to residents.

The property was drawn into annexation maps by the city of Atlanta and La Vista Hills. The failure of La Vista Hills to become a city left the area in unincorporated DeKalb County waiting to be annexed by someone, Bennett said.

“We want to pick our future,” Bennett said.

Councilmember Joe Gebbia, who will represent the area, said he had been in talks with the residents for about two years.

“Welcome aboard,” Gebbia said.

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