A seven-story office tower in Sandy Springs will soon be demolished for an apartment and retail building, according to Davis Development, the firm behind the project.

Construction fencing recently went up around the office tower at 6075-6077 Roswell Road. (Photo John Ruch)

The office building at 6075-6077 Roswell Road will be replaced by a roughly five-story building containing 291 apartments and retail space, along with a new parking deck.

The tower has been vacated over the past year as leases expire. A major tenant was the Taboo 2 nightclub, which closed last month and “merged” with the new Barnacles sports bar at 8371 Roswell Road, according to the club’s Facebook page.

Construction fencing went up around the building in recent days and demolition will begin soon, said Kayla Morris of Davis Development, though she could not give an exact date.

The tower was built in the 1960s by Howard Chatham, according to the local historical organization Heritage Sandy Springs, when it was reportedly the area’s first “skyscraper” and first building containing an elevator. At that time, it was known for its C&S bank, which reportedly had a helicopter land on the roof to transfer cash.

The southern side of the office tower at 6075-6077 Roswell Road. (Photo John Ruch)

In two related projects last year, a Bank of America branch moved from the tower to a new building next door, and the former Sandy Springs post office on the property was demolished.

An early design illustration of the mixed-use redevelopment coming to 6075-6077 Roswell Road.

Davis Development’s project is adjacent to Mill Creek’s redevelopment of the former Hilderbrand Court shopping center, also for a large mixed-use project. A new public street will be created between the two projects. The post office was demolished to make way for that street, which may be named for a legendary local doctor.

To the south of the 6075-6077 property is another office building, the nine-story Northside Tower, which was bought by Stein Investment Group late last year for $13 million. Jason Linscott, Stein’s chief investment officer, said the company intends to put $2 million into renovating Northside Tower. Asked why the company isn’t undertaking a redevelopment like Davis’s mixed-use project next door, Linscott said it is because Northside Tower’s 95 percent occupancy rate and amenities make its office use more valuable than that type of redevelopment. The offices of Reporter Newspapers and its parent company, Springs Publishing, are in Northside Tower.

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