The Boys & Girls Club property in Brookhaven is being fenced off after officials with the organization say it has become the recent target of vandalism.

The entrance to the former Brookhaven Boys & Girls Club. (File photo)

In the next few days, the entire perimeter of the Boys & Girls Club property at 1330 North Druid Hills Road will be fenced off to the public to mark it as private property, according to Natasha Rice, Vice President of Business Administration.

The nonprofit organization wants the community to know the fencing off of the site is being done to protect the property and not out of any ill will, she said.

“We recently had an instance of vandalism where the door to our Teen Center was smashed. We have also had people begin to dump items, including a couch, in our parking lot and surrounding grounds,” Rice said in a statement. “We will be boarding up this damage and adding a fence around the club to protect the property.”

The Brookhaven City Council voted 3-1 in a controversial decision to rezone the property from R-75 (single-family residential) to RM-100 (multi-family residential). The rezoning makes way for Ashton Woods to build a 59-unit development to replace the beloved organization that was located in the city for 40 years. The Boys & Girls closed its Brookhaven location Dec. 20 and opened a larger facility in Chamblee in January.

The property is under contract for sale pending zoning approval. Ashton Woods is currently seeking several variances from the Zoning Board of Appeals.

“We have been going through the sale process for nearly a year now and we vacated the property back in January,” Rice said.

The Chamblee Boys & Girls Club opened in January and Rice said nearly all of the children and teens who used the Brookhaven club are now being served at the new location.

Vandals recently shattered a door at the Boys & Girls Club. (Boys & Girls Club)

“We’ve also seen new kids from the surrounding area signing up. This club has a much larger footprint and in the coming years will be able to serve nearly 50 percent more kids,” she said.

 

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