Perimeter Progressives, one of several regional political groups that rose in the wake of President Trump’s election, is calling it quits.

The group, which drew more than 100 residents and elected officials to its debut meeting in Dunwoody roughly 18 months ago, said in a Sept. 4 farewell statement that the competition since then made it unnecessary.

The Perimeter Progressives logo on display at the February 2017 debut meeting in Dunwoody. (File/John Ruch)

“In the fullness of time as these groups have matured and sharpened their focus, we knew that some of us had overlapping goals,” said the statement posted on Facebook. “In order not to dilute the finite energy needed to reach the results we strive for, Perimeter Progressives will discontinue operations.”

Joe Seconder, the Dunwoody Democrat who founded Perimeter Progressives roughly 18 months ago, did not respond to a comment request. His name was not among those of the “executive board” that signed the farewell announcement. State records show the group formally dissolved on Sept. 7.

At its founding, Perimeter Progressives was plainly Democratic, but presented as nominally open to centrist Republicans and independents who were turned off by Trump. Its debut meeting in February 2017 came as the special election for the 6th Congressional District seat was gearing up. The campaign manager for Jon Ossoff, the Democrat who would come surprisingly close to election in the nation’s most expensive Congressional election of all time, was in attendance. Also showing up were other candidates, City Council members from Chamblee and Dunwoody, and the then-president of the Dunwoody Homeowners Association.

Newsletters indicate the group stopped meeting formally last fall. Since then, it has advocated various liberal causes and political positions on social media and suggested opportunities for demonstrations against U.S. Rep. Karen Handel, the Republican who defeated Ossoff for the local Congressional seat.

The farewell announcement suggested other groups that Perimeter Progressives members might work with, such as Drinking Liberally and Indivisible.

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