An illustration included in the Sandy Springs Police report shows the how the accident happened, with the first car rear-ending the truck then swerving into other lanes. (Special)

A driver of a car was found at fault for an April wreck involving a dump truck working on the Transform 285/400 project.

The Georgia Department of Transportation, which is in charge of the massive work reconstructing the I-285/Ga. 400 interchange, said the accident is a reminder to the public to drive safely in the construction zones.

The car driver was traveling on southbound Ga. 400 on April 3 and rear-ended the truck after it exited a construction site near Abernathy Road, according to a Sandy Springs Police report. The car then spun into the other lanes and was hit by another vehicle.

The car driver, who is a Cumming resident, was cited for following too closely, the report said. The driver was the only person injured and was taken to WellStar North Fulton Hospital for treatment.

The speed limit in the area is 55 mph, according to the report.

The Transform 285/400 project has closed and shifted many lanes and roads. In a written statement, GDOT spokesperson Natalie Dale said drivers should pay close attention to driving in these affected areas.

“Work zones are unique in that they may change day to day due to lane shifts or closures, reduced speed limits, and other variables,” Dale said. “We ask everyone to take work zones seriously and understand that many of these incidents are preventable by taking simple precautions, like paying strict attention to driving and not talking on the phone in a work zone.”

The week following the wreck, April 8 to 12, was National Work Zone Safety Awareness Week, Dale said. Fatal work zone crashes are increasing in Georgia, according to GDOT data distributed during that week. There were 23 fatalities in 2014, 55 in 2017 and 52 in 2018.

In 2018, there were 27,235 crashes in work zones, resulting in 8,928 injuries, according to GDOT.

GDOT advises drivers to pay attention to the road, slow down and watch for workers.

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