Author: Reporter Newspapers

“Name Your Neighborhood Stream”

The City of Sandy Springs has partnered with several local community groups for the “Name Your Neighborhood Stream” project that will use residents’ votes to christen 11 unnamed streams in the city. The winning name for each stream will be certified by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and will appear on official city maps. The USGS is responsible for approving the names of all physical features in the country. The project, which has been spearheaded by district 6 Councilwoman Karen Meinzen-McEnerny, includes a partnership with Heritage Sandy Springs, Sandy Springs Conservancy, the Sandy Springs Council of Neighborhoods, Brown and Caldwell Environmental Engineers and Consultants, Holy Spirit Prep School, Trees Sandy Springs and the Long Island Creek Watershed Association. The submissions will be judged by McEnerny, city representatives and the project partners. Residents can choose from already-suggested stream names compiled by historians from Heritage Sandy Springs, or they can think of their own. All names will be considered for selection. “We’re pleased to offer this opportunity for community involvement,” McEnerny said. “By naming some of our City’s natural resources, residents will be shaping history.” Name submissions can be emailed to Councilwoman McEnerny at karen.mcenerny@sandyspringsga.org. For more information on the “Name Your Neighborhood Stream” project, please call...

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City debuts new rescue unit

On Sept. 10, the Sandy Springs Fire Rescue Department put a new rescue unit into service at Station 4 on Wieuca Road and added Advanced Life Support (ALS) to the Quint 3 unit at Station 3. The fire trucks are referred to as “Quints” because they perform the five separate functions of being equipped with a booster tank, ground ladders, a hose, aerial ladders and a pump. The Advanced Life Support (ALS) added to Quint 3, now increases the capacity of emergency medical services to cover the entire city. Sandy Springs has staffed up six positions to accommodate the additional Quint. “This puts more units on the streets,” said Deputy Fire Chief Dennis Ham. “Having Rescue 4 increases our response time in the southwestern sector of the city. It frees up the Quint at Station 4 for other calls. However, if a rescue call comes in while Rescue 4 is on a rescue call, the Quint and its personnel can go on that one. So, in essence, we have double coverage now for Station 4 like all the others.” The ALS-equipped Quint 3 joins the already ALS-equipped Quints 1, 2 and 4, from their respective stations. Advanced Life Support is a treatment consensus for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in cardiac arrest and related medical problems. Ham said the new vehicle has similar advantages besides providing increased coverage. “Having Rescue 4...

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Roswell Road signal retiming saves $11 million in first year

In just over one year, a major signal retiming on Roswell Road has saves Sandy Springs motorists $11 million in terms of fuel and time. The estimate comes from study findings released this month by the private firm Geostats and is calculated based on an average fuel price of $3 a gallon and motorist time valued at an average of $10 an hour. According to the city, while motorists on Roswell Road between the City of Atlanta limits and the Chattahoochee River may still notice traffic snarls, they are also likely to spend significantly less time idling in traffic overall. In comparison to a year ago, drivers headed southbound in the afternoon rush hour and northbound in morning rush hour may experience, on average, a 40 percent reduction in their travel time during those peak hours. In northbound afternoon rush hour, a reduction of 11.47 percent travel time is average. “Saving the average area motorist just a few minutes a day on Roswell Road, as this study shows, can result in millions of dollars in cost savings over the course of a year,” said Mayor Eva Galambos. “The end goal of signal retiming efforts is to get drivers to their destinations with greater ease, as well as reducing the psychological, financial and environmental costs of being stuck in traffic.” Major state routes like Roswell Road that provide direct highway...

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Timing of Dave Greenspan’s resignation: ‘How conveeenient’

To the editor: On the very day Sandy Springs City Councilman Dave Greenspan resigned his office to take a job out of state, lifelong Dekalb County and Dunwoody resident Trey Ragsdale, a career political operative, a former intern in the Clinton White House and former Democratic Senate staffer, announced his intention to run for the vacant seat. Simultaneous with the Greenspan resignation, Councilwoman Ashley Jenkins and the resigning Dave Greenspan publicly endorsed Ragsdale as the “best qualified” to represent the District. As the Saturday Night Live Church Lady might say, “how conveeenient.” Based on the way this was politically orchestrated, and given Ragsdale’s political experience, my guess is that he worked in concert with these two council members to put his campaign in place, draft his press releases and when all was ready, Greenspan pulled the trigger timing his resignation so as to discourage others from mounting a campaign. It’s nice to have friends in high places. This is not the way we hoped the new City of Sandy Springs would operate. Many of us who voted to become a city did so because we wanted transparency in government and hoped for the honesty and the openness from our public officials we never received from Fulton County. Instead, we’re getting these cynical, back room schemes. This is the old Fulton County political cronyism we all despised. It was wrong...

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Council favoring Morgan Falls for dog park if privately funded

By John Schaffner editor@reporternewspapers.net The leash connecting plans for a city dog park to Ridgeview Park was possibly removed at the Sept. 11 work session of the Sandy Springs City Council when four of the five members of council present said they favored having the dog park wander to the north end of the city at the planned Great Park at Morgan Falls. The one hitch in that decision, however, is that developer John Willis, who lives near Ridgeview Park and has vehemently opposed locating the dog park there, must help raise the $200,000 it is projected to cost to develop the dog park at Morgan Falls. Council members Dianne Fries, Ashley Jenkins, Tibby DeJulio and Mayor Eva Galambos all said their order of preference for the dog park site among the three options presented by City Manager John McDonough was Morgan Falls first, Ridgeview Park second and Hammond Park last, although none really wanted Hammond Park seriously considered. The lone dissenter was Councilwoman Karen Meinzen McEnerny who argued for placing the dog park at Hammond Park and said her order of preference would be Hammond Park, Ridgeview Park and Morgan Falls Park last. District 3 Councilman Rusty Paul was not at the meeting and the District 1 seat remains vacant until the Nov. 6 election following the late August resignation of Dave Greenspan. The new consideration of Morgan...

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