Author: Reporter Newspapers

Moores Mill residents seek to stop trucks

By C. Julia Nelson Fifteen commercial trucks bearing more than six wheels illegally drove along Moores Mill Road in the Ridgeview Heights neighborhood of Buckhead between 10:20 and 11:20 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 7. Despite the four signs posted along Moores Mill, or the fact that the ordinance carries a $500 penalty, truck drivers still use the residential road as a cut-through. Almost a decade has passed since the City of Atlanta adopted ordinance 98-0-0204. It specifically prohibits commercial trucks in excess of 30 feet, weighing more than18 tons and having more than six wheels from traveling the stretch of Moores Mill Road between I-75 and Bolton Road. But to drive that length of road on weekdays between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m., one would never know such a thing existed based on current traffic patterns. Residents are concerned about the illegal use of Moores Mill after fighting for years to alleviate the traffic safety issue. During the last meeting in 2007 of the Neighborhood Planning Unit-C (NPU-C) at Trinity Presbyterian Church, a unanimous vote of 16-0 supported a resolution reminding Atlanta City Council of its obligation to enforce the ordinance. Heather Grimsely, President of the Ridgewood Heights Neighborhood Association, presented the resolution at the meeting. “In the last six months, (Moores Mill Road residents) have seen an increased volume of heavy trucks on Moores Mill, the majority of...

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Neighborhoods feel BeltLine plan is lacking clear direction

By John Schaffner editor@reporternewspapers.net The leadership of the Peachtree Hills Civic Association feels the BeltLine Master Plan work is suffering from “a lack of clear direction and the lack of a clear plan,” coupled with city planners and their hired consultants not doing basic research and not paying attention to comments from the public. And, Peachtree Hills is not alone in its concerns as the master planning public process nears its conclusion this month and in January. According to Peachtree Hills resident Frank Sommers, who grew up in Brookwood Hills and has a father who has been active in that association for years, Brookwood Hills neighborhood leaders share many of the concerns of Peachtree Hills over plans for the proposed Peachtree Creek Parkway and the routing of the PATH Foundation trail through the area of their neighborhoods. Also, during the Nov. 27 meeting of the BeltLine Master Plan Sub Area 7 stakeholders steering committee, Piedmont Heights representative Bill Seay was stunned to discover the Armour Drive/Armour Circle area, which this year was placed by the city in his neighborhood, was to be redeveloped as an industrial area rather than mixed-use residential that previously was his understanding. The Brookwood Hills, Peachtree Hills and North Collier Hills neighborhoods also feel their concerns are not being heard regarding proposed redevelopment density along Peachtree Road and stepping down into the edges of their...

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Amy’s Party: A holiday gift for 500 children

By Ellen Fix It’s hard not to be swept away with the excitement and flurry of last-minute preparations for Amy’s Party. “I need four people to help me get 40 pizzas out of someone’s car and into the kitchen.” Immediately, four youthful volunteers, wearing special Amy’s Party t-shirts and donning red Santa caps, rush to assist Carly Blaiss, one of Amy’s friends. Other volunteers are cutting pieces of cakes and putting them on paper plates, filling bowls with snacks, arranging gifts by age group in the ‘toy store, checking the decorations, dressing up as Santa’s elves and stationing themselves at arts and crafts and game tables. Soon, the guests would arrive at the Weber Jewish Community High School on Roswell Road in Sandy Springs – nearly 500 children from 25 metro Atlanta shelters and two foster care systems. That was Sunday, Dec. 9, a memorable day for the children and the volunteers. It’s obvious this was to be no ordinary Christmas party. And Amy Sacks Zeide, who founded the annual holiday event 13 years ago when she was 13, is no ordinary person. You might say Amy, a Sandy Springs native who still lives in the area with husband Aaron, has an innate sense of social justice. And it was nurtured by a family that integrated giving back to the community as part of her upbringing. Amy’s father, Dr....

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New city driving program is aimed at saving teenagers’ lives

By Katie Fallon katiefallon@sandysprings.org While every graduating class of Leadership Sandy Springs completes a group community project, the results of last year’s class effort has the potential to save lives, especially those of teenagers. Leadership Sandy Springs, which gathers local leaders for community action and improvement, has partnered with the Sandy Springs Police Department and the Safe America Foundation to form the first SafeTeen Georgia affiliate in the city. The program will include 30 hours of classroom instruction at Apostles Lutheran Church on Glenridge Drive. In addition the course fee will include six or 10 hours of behind-the-wheel instruction taught by SafeTeen instructors. The inaugural classes will be held during the upcoming winter break from school. The first session will be held Dec. 26 to 29 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The second session will take place Jan. 2 to 5 during the same time period. The program is designed to fulfill the requirement set forth by the newly enacted Joshua’s Law. As of Jan. 1 of this year, all 16-year-olds are required to complete a driver’s education course approved by the Department of Driver’s Services to obtain their Class D driver’s license. The teens, as was the case prior to Joshua’s Law, must also complete a cumulative total of at least 40 hours of other supervised driving experience, and six of those training hours must be completed...

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Kudos to city for quick trash pickup

To the editor: Gratitude and kudos to the city of Sandy Springs for the quick response and thorough cleanup of the garbage tsunami that struck Roberts Road between Davis Academy and Northridge on Wednesday, Nov. 21. The city of Sandy Springs was notified of the disaster, and within 24 hours the debris was cleaned and the environment returned to normalcy. This was an avalanche of trash! Coincidentally, Waste Management Systems picks up residential refuse in the area on Wednesday morning, and the incident had all the visual indicators of trash bags blown from a refuse vehicle. The city of Sandy Springs is missing a revenue opportunity by assigning a clean-up crew to the waste site without sending a forensic “garbologist” as well. Is it not illegal to litter? Why should taxpayers shoulder the burden of cleanup without compensation from the violator? In this case, a culprit could have been identified immediately. The city of Sandy Springs can easily justify the salary expense for enforcement of litter and sign ordinance violations by the revenue garnered from fining the perpetrators: $25 for every intersection or telephone pole sign, $100 and more for documented littering incidents. This could add up to some real money. And consider this, an estimated 95 percent of the sign and litter violators are not residents of Sandy Springs!! Trash...

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