Author: Reporter Newspapers

Mayor, council members react to Dave Greenspan’s resignation

Following the resignation of District 1 Sandy Springs City Councilman David Greenspan, the city’s mayor and council members were asked by the Reporter for their reactions to the resignation. The following are the responses from the mayor and three of the council members: Mayor Eva Galambos: “Of course we will miss Dave, one of our original founding council members. But he needs to move on with his life, and follow his career opportunities. One of our lasting memories of Dave on City Council is that he read all the fine print in the long ordinances we were handed early on when there was such a rush to get some laws on the books. Dave was really diligent and questioning each clause. Dave made it his personal mission to obtain public access to sports facilities of the public schools, when the schools are not using these. With the help of city staff he persevered, and finally in August we signed the first agreement giving access to playing fields at the Sandy Springs Middle School.” District 2 Councilwoman Dianne Fries: “I will miss Council Member Greenspan. Our districts wrapped around each other so, that we really became close friends while working together on various projects and issues. I wish him all the best on his new endeavors and plan on keeping in touch.” District 3 Councilwoman Ashley Jenkins: “Dave was a...

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Resources for ‘bringing a community together’

Editor’s Notes John F. Schaffner I believe there are certain elements, when put in place, that can effectively work to turn a somewhat cold, government-oriented city into a healthy, vibrant, people-oriented community. Some of those elements seem to be fitting into place and working in Sandy Springs. A couple of things that took place over the Labor Day weekend that got me thinking some about this direction for Sandy Springs. First, but not in order of occurrence, my wife and I attended the last of this summer’s series of concerts at the Sandy Springs Society Entertainment Lawn at Heritage Green. That is quite a mouthful to say for such an intimate, but greatly improved venue for performances and other events. We managed to make three of the concerts this summer and thoroughly enjoyed each of them. And, I might add, that we were pleasantly surprised at the size of the audience that turned our for each—even the Labor Day Georgia Brass Band concert which we thought might not have the draw due to the holiday. It was watching people mingle with friends and even strangers—sitting at tables, on blankets on the grass or in lawn chairs—and enjoying good food, drink, companionship and, of course, good music, that brought my wife to lean over to me and comment: “This is such a perfect place and event for bringing a community...

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Historic site at center of Sandy Springs Festival

By Katie Fallon katiefallon@reporternewspapers.net Heritage Sandy Springs will continue a long-standing community tradition by hosting the 22nd annual Sandy Springs Festival Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 15 and 16. The two-day festival will be held from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. One-day admission to the event is $5 for adults, $2 for children ages 6 to 18 and free for children age five and younger. Members of Heritage Sandy Springs are admitted free. The festival is held on the grounds of the Sandy Springs Historic Site, home to the Williams-Payne House, and its bordering streets, which include Sandy Springs Circle, Hilderbrand Drive, Blue Stone Road and Sandy Springs Place. Visitors of all ages will find something of interest at the festival, including the Artist’s Market, Business and Civic Expo, Children’s Park, Collector Car Show, Food Court, Heritage Crafters, a pet parade, Teen Territory, a silent auction and various opportunities for live entertainment. The inspiration for the festival, which will feature many local artists and entertainers, is to continue the grassroots efforts that saved the Sandy Springs Historic Site and the Williams-Payne House and started the quality of life journey the community has been on for decades prior to becoming a city in 2005. The historic site, which includes the original spring for which the community was named, was first...

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Sembler gets first approval for Circuit City rezoning at Prado

By Katie Fallon katiefallon@reporternewspapers.net Following a long debate at its Aug. 28 meeting, the city’s Design Review Board approved by a 5-1 vote a partial rezoning within the Prado that will bring a 20,331 square foot Circuit City to the shopping center’s redevelopment. Located on Roswell Road just south of the I-285 interchange, the Prado is undergoing a massive development by the Sembler Company. While the entire site is approximately 27.15 acres, the rezoning in question was a 2.07 acre tract of land that has partial frontage on Roswell Road. The electronics giant is scheduled to occupy the space and will join other so-called “big-box” retailers such as Publix, Home Depot and Target. The vote, which came with board member Marlise Landeck in opposition, included stipulations that Prado LLC, the applicant for the rezoning, provide screens from the development’s “mechanicals” for the neighbors, create a similar façade on the Circuit City building that has been planned for the northern elevation of the Publix and that the developer confirm that the project will have a limited effect on traffic. The DRB previously deferred the matter during its Aug. 14 meeting. However, Prado LLC, Sembler and its legal representative Pete Hendricks drew the ire of the board at its Aug. 28 meeting because the group chose to take the matter to the Planning Commission after the initial deferment rather than waiting...

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Council approves special election despite county’s bills

By Katie Fallon katiefallon@reporternewspapers.net Following the resignation of District 1 Councilman Dave Greenspan, the city council on Sept. 4 approved a resolution calling for a Nov. 6 special election and possible runoff election for Dec. 4. The council also approved a resolution to let the Fulton County Board of Elections run the election, despite the city only just receiving an exorbitant bill for its 2005 mayoral and council elections. Steve Rapson, the city’s Assistant City Manager for Administration and Finance, reported this November’s special election is estimated to cost the city $36,420, with a runoff election estimated at $19,434. This year’s special election cost estimates, Rapson said, are mostly for traditional items like poll workers, managers and rental fees for vehicles, cell phones and even polling places. The feels however, also include a 10 percent administrative surcharge. Rapson received a chorus of groans, though, when he reported to the city council that the city has just received a bill from Fulton County for the special elections it held in 2005 before the city officially opened for business on Dec. 1 of that year. Rapson said that new bill for the old election is approximately $288,000. “When I saw this invoice with all the items, I hit the ceiling,” Mayor Eva Galambos said. “I cannot believe what they are charging us.” Rapson said that he has explained to the Board...

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