Category: Commentary

Letter: If college athletes get paid, reward teams, not just superstars

Thank you for publishing the commentary “Amateur sports are worth saving” by Alan Chadwick in the Reporter. I appreciate your paper sharing a local football head coach’s perspective on a national topic. I agree that the “pay for play” policy by the NCAA could open up many issues and problems for many college athletes. I most agree with the quote included in the commentary from Tim Tebow, that the game will become only about each individual player, instead of the team as a whole. A better idea, I think, is to pay a reward to the whole team, not...

Read More

Robin’s Nest: In and out of the Facebook conga line

I have a November birthday. You may not know this, but Facebook does, and if you follow me on FB, you’re bound to be given that information because my name will pop up in your inbox next to a birthday cake and a cheery reminder to let me know you’re thinking of me. People often note that one thing Facebook gets right is birthdays, and it’s true that this particular social network provides ample reminders to its users of the birthdates of fellow users. But, as Peter Parker’s Uncle Ben once said, with great power comes great responsibility. Once...

Read More

Commentary: A legislator and a coach on whether paying college athletes is fair or foul

The rules appear to be changing when it comes to who benefits financially from college sports. The National College Athletic Association’s board of governors has decided to allow college athletes the chance to be paid for the commercial use of their images, names and likenesses. The board adopted the change Oct. 29 after California lawmakers adopted new law called the “Fair Play To Play Act.” Under that law, California would have become the first state to allow college athletes to be paid for use of their images or identities in commercial ventures such as video games or if they...

Read More

Around Town: Pioneering members of an all-girl scout troop aim to be Eagles

OK, let’s get this out of the way right at the start: Yes, these girl scouts have sold cookies. Not those familiar Girl Scout cookies in their brightly colored boxes. No, these scouts raised money for their new troop by selling chocolate chip cookies and brownies they’d baked. After all, they’re not Girl Scouts. They’re scouts who happen to be girls. They’re members of Troop 398, a new gathering of girls organized at Northside United Methodist Church under the scouting program created by the 109-year-old Boy Scouts of America. The Boy Scouts announced in 2017 that it would allow...

Read More

Letter: Clear contrasts in the race for mayor of Brookhaven, says Councilmember Park

In the race for mayor in Brookhaven, both candidates agree on a lot of things that Mayor John Ernst has accomplished, including: 1. Brookhaven is the safest city, thanks to our tremendous police force; 2. Acquiring 55 acres of green space and building the Peachtree Creek Greenway with outside funding sources is good for the community; 3. We are on the right track with improving city infrastructure, such as paving, stormwater and sidewalks; and 4. Acquiring four new parks and enhancing all 18 city parks with new facilities and features. Having worked with both Mayor Ernst and his opponent...

Read More

Worth Knowing: Dunwoody’s first lady leaves a legacy of boosting nonprofits

Imagine your husband’s just been elected mayor of a very young city. You have a role, but no script. No one knows what to expect of you. Including you. As Mayor Denis Shortal prepares to end his 11 years of service to the city of Dunwoody, I spent some time with Meredy Shortal, who has been a very visible First Lady, to hear how she figured it all out. When I asked her how she felt when her husband announced he wouldn’t run for another term, she said, “My first thought was, ‘Good thing I haven’t cut the tags...

Read More

Letter: Heath would bring needed change as Brookhaven mayor

Over the last few years, I’ve noticed some disturbing trends in our lovely city. The city administration has grown immensely, yet common sense tells me our small city doesn’t need this bureaucracy. I see trees cut down, more traffic, more fences and cement structures in our parks, more buildings going up and more spending. It doesn’t fit with why we said we wanted our city to be a city! That is why I am voting for Jen Heath for mayor. I attended the recent mayoral forum and heard Jen’s perspective on “our city of neighborhoods.” I liked what I...

Read More

Letter: Dunwoody is blessed to have tough choices between candidates

How many times have we pondered, “It’s the choice between two evils,” prior to an election? Dunwoody is truly blessed by a group of candidates that are known as active, community members, each with their own ideas on how to improve the city. Dunwoody’s election challenge is differentiating between candidates. One differentiating factor for me is how well the candidate succeeds at working with others to achieve consensus. Another differentiating factor is track record. The last is faith. Consensus is four votes on City Council. The mayor has no special power — by design. My support for Terry Nall...

Read More

Worth Knowing: SCORE helps small businesses for free in Sandy Springs

Owning a small business is not for the faint of heart. According to the U.S. Small Business Association, 30 percent of new businesses fail during their first two years, 50 percent during their first five, and 66 percent during their first 10. Despite the risks, for many of us, owning our own business is the American Dream. According to JPMorgan Chase, 99 percent of America’s 29.7 million firms are small businesses, with 88 percent of them having 20 or fewer employees. In fact, small businesses drive our economy, providing over half of all private-sector jobs. Luckily, since 1964 the...

Read More

Commentary: Voting against Ethics Act is most ethical choice

This November, DeKalb County voters will head to the polls to vote on revisions to an Ethics Act passed in 2015 by 92% of voters. The ballot will have no explanation of the revisions, and voters should not be fooled. This legislation does not revise the Board of Ethics. It guts it. How? By undermining the board’s independence, putting up roadblocks for reporting ethics concerns, and compromising the professionalism and efficiency of the board and staff. There are three key issues with the ethics bill: First, there is the matter of independence. The bill undermines the independence of the...

Read More

Robin’s Nest: A knife to remember, or forget

I was summoned for jury duty over the summer, an occasion which happens with stunning regularity every five years. It reminded me of a situation that occurred decades ago, the first time I appeared for duty. After entering the courthouse with a stream of other ordinary-looking people and falling into the security line, I had put my purse and jacket on the conveyer belt for screening and waited my turn to pass through the metal detector. As I was waiting, I heard one of the security officers say to the other, “This one’s got a knife.” I gasped audibly,...

Read More

Around Town: Looking back with a laugh through a classic movies club

They’re not exactly the latest thing in movies. Then again, that’s sort of the point. These films show where modern movies came from. And they show what movies used to be. That’s part of the reason Hylda Wilson comes to the Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta to watch the movies shown through its Classics Film Club. “I like old movies,” she said. “They’re different. I don’t like the new movies. They’re not fairy tales.” Wilson’s 86 and says she’s been watching movies since 1937 or so. She lives in Sandy Springs now, but remembers going to see “picture...

Read More
Loading
Subscribe to our daily & weekly emails with community news

Subscribe to our daily & weekly emails with community news

You have Successfully Subscribed!