Category: Commentary

Letter: Sandy Springs government shouldn’t spend money on new cut-through roads

Regarding the story “Sandy Springs explores options for ‘street connectivity’ following residents’ concern” and the quote from Assistant City Manager Jim Tolbert that “In cul-de-sacs, everyone has to go around to get to where they are going…there are no direct trips”: Can we please have government focus on using money to fund new parks, sidewalks, roads and schools, and not on reducing travel time and distance for people who don’t live on cul-de-sacs? Can you imagine the cost of buying out a house at the end of the road, tearing it down, disposing of the debris, preparing the grade...

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Robin’s Nest: As the school years pass, so do the backpack fashions

In the beginning, there was the diaper bag. It was made of vinyl, and no matter what any designer did to disguise it, it was still a vinyl diaper bag. Ours was covered with teal-colored elephants, so there was no doubt to anyone that it was not my purse or my weekender travel bag, but that it was there to serve the youngest among us. It contained everything we needed to feed, change, entertain and care for our baby—everything short of an actual nanny, although it was big enough to hold one. We lugged it around for years until...

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Around Town: Jamming on the old tunes at a Sandy Springs barbecue spot

Libby Lintel played piano, but she decided it was too solitary an instrument. She wanted to tackle music that would allow her more chances to play with other people. So, a little more than six years ago, she took up the banjo. Learning to play her new open-backed banjo led her to “old-time” music, the slice of American folk music associated with songs and string bands of the Appalachians. “The old tunes are pretty,” the 57-year-old Cobb County resident said. “They’re simple melodies. They’re historic. It kind of links you with the past.” It links her with like-minded musicians,...

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Worth Knowing: In a leap of faith, a new church is born

In the last 20 years, attendance at American houses of worship has dropped 20 percent, according to Gallup. Last year, the percentage of Americans reporting church or synagogue membership reached an all-time low of 50 percent. So, why would anyone want to start another church? That’s what I asked a group of Dunwoodians who five months ago started a Bible study in a private home that is now preparing for its official launch as an independent church in a 70-year-old stone chapel in Sandy Springs. Miracle? You decide. It all started last March when a popular worship leader left...

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Commentary: Nicknaming the 285/400 interchange

It’s big. It’s expensive. It already has created controversy and angered drivers and it’s not even going to be finished until next year. But one thing the rebuilt interchange at I-285 and Ga. 400 doesn’t have is a name. It needs one, if only to keep up with Spaghetti Junction, the Cobb Cloverleaf, the Downtown Connector and other metro Atlanta highway landmarks. We came up with a few suggestions of our own and asked our readers on social media to suggest more nicknames for the collection of concrete taking form on the Perimeter. And they came through. In a...

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Robin’s Nest: Even laundry, cooking and cleaning feels like a vacation in the mountains

I don’t usually do nothing. I’m not a do-nothing person. But here, in the mountains in our house built of logs, I feel like I have not only permission but almost an obligation to do nothing. If it’s pouring outside, I can spend the day listening to the rain on our metal roof while lying on the couch with a good book. If it’s warm outside, I can choose the hammock. In the morning, I sit on the deck perched on a tall chair with a cup of coffee, watching as the mist rises like steam over the river...

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Worth Knowing: Hospital’s volunteer corps celebrates a half-century ‘paying it forward’

Ten years ago, after a successful career as a corporate executive, Dunwoody resident Chris Cox retired and soon found herself in a bed at Northside Hospital recovering from breast cancer surgery. Filled with fear and uncertainty about her future, she was visited by a former patient who had survived the same surgery. Dressed in a Northside Hospital Auxiliary blue volunteer’s coat, Cox’s visitor answered her questions and allayed her fears. Thus began a whole lot of healing beyond cancer. When she felt better, Cox began spending four hours a week doing for other breast cancer patients what had been...

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Letter: Dunwoody Village makeover should be an election year priority

Vacant storefronts, empty lots, high rents, overemphasis on surface parking, non-pedestrian-friendly roads and walkways, and of course BANKS… these are all descriptions that accurately depict the current state of affairs at the city of Dunwoody’s core: the Dunwoody Village. The Master Plan for Dunwoody Village has been around for so long now that I’m beginning to wonder if development in the area will ever in fact materialize, or is it just another pipe dream similar to Dunwoody desiring to have its own school district? At least two community input meetings have occurred within the last year that focused on...

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Commentary: A pivotal moment for the future of Sandy Springs’ North End

We are excited about the future of the North End in Sandy Springs and fully support smart development that creates a place for families presently living in the neighborhoods. It’s important that any changes reflect the voices of everyone who will feel the impact, not just the developers who stand to profit. Our community is at a pivotal point. What we do now will determine whether our future is one where all families can live, thrive and grow. Sandy Springs Together supports the revitalization of the North End by redevelopment of underutilized shopping centers, the addition of walking paths,...

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Commentary: Make sure every Atlantan counts in the 2020 Census

Census 2020 is an opportunity Atlanta cannot afford to miss. The Census, which only occurs every 10 years, is a critically important event that has real-life consequences for every resident and everyone in Atlanta. The information collected by the census determines two things: power and money. The number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives, how many Electoral College votes states receive, and how we draw state legislative districts are all dependent on our Census count. It is also used to determine the distribution of billions of dollars in federal funds to local communities. For...

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Around Town: A farmers market director’s work is never done – and always delicious

Sara Craig-Goodell has a thing for food. She’s quick to say so. “Yes, I do like food,” she says with a grin. “I like eating it. I like learning about it. … How can you not care about food? I spend most of my day waiting for get hungry again so I can eat.” Her fondness for good food comes naturally. She remembers visiting her grandparent’s home and orchard in rural Mexico, where she dined on fresh avocados and pecan, limes and figs, persimmons and nectarines. “I’ve just always been a big eater,” she said. “I like to try...

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Commentary: How to take back our streets for pedestrians

Editor’s Note: In recent weeks, accidents have injured non-motor-vehicle-driving users of major local roads, including a bicyclist and a pedestrian killed on Sandy Springs’ Roswell Road and pedestrians injured on Brookhaven’s Buford Highway and Buckhead’s Peachtree Road. The Reporter asked Sally Flocks of the advocacy group PEDS about her group’s vision of safer streets. If you’re like me, you dream of your community becoming a place where children walk to school, the elderly cross the street without fear, and streets are places where people enjoy chance encounters on sidewalks and at street cafes. Walkability doesn’t happen on its own....

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