Category: Commentary

Commentary: A note to Atlanta on race and inclusion

As we consider and enter into conversations about race in every facet of our lives, let us center the Black women and non-Black women of color who have been having these conversations for years, for whom this work is not something we picked up in the last three weeks, but lifelong. These conversations with one another have been survival mechanism, sustenance and sanctuary. We urge leaders everywhere to center, amplify and value us, our work and our stories, because much of what we have experienced and the treatment we have endured can serve as cautionary lessons for what not...

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Worth Knowing: 4th of July Parade’s riders hold their horses for pandemic’s end

Thanks to COVID-19, the 2020 Dunwoody 4th of July parade was canceled. Based on past attendance, more than 2,500 participants and 32,000 spectators were left with a gaping hole in their Independence Day. Especially disappointed were the members of the Central Georgia Mounted Color Guard, the patriotic riders and horses that carry the flags and lead the parade. According to parade Co-Chair Pam Talmadge, when the pandemic caused participants to start pulling out even before the cancellation, the one group that was all in was the CGMCG. Though most parade-goers have a favorite float or band, the horses seem...

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Letter: Thanks for story on racism in north metro Atlanta’s history

Thank you for this excellent story. (“How race and racism shaped growth and cityhood in north metro Atlanta,” July 3.) I was born in downtown Atlanta in Piedmont Hospital in 1954. I grew up in Decatur, Georgia. I graduated from Georgia Tech as an engineer and software developer. I moved to Dunwoody in 1995 for traffic reasons because I worked for a Fortune 100 company starting in 1974  as a co-op student and then for two software companies, all in Perimeter Center, until about 2002. Your story filled in a significant amount of understanding even for me. I understand...

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Commentary: So, yeah, I had COVID-19

Editor’s note: Collin Kelley, the editor of our sister publication Atlanta INtown, wrote this commentary for the July issue of that newspaper. Back at the end of March, I thought I might have COVID-19. I had a low-grade fever, sniffles, low back pain, and no taste or smell for a week, which was followed by a few days of fatigue. I mentioned it to only a handful of people because I didn’t want to cause alarm, and since it never progressed to the cough or lung stage, I chalked it up to flu or a cold. I didn’t think...

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Letter: Do the right thing and support black lives

I write in support of black lives and the changes happening in our society. We live in a time where people who are harmed the most and given the least amount of opportunity are expected to prove the value of their lives. Our Brookhaven/Buford Highway community is made up of many people. It is made up of different voices, religions, and values that all come together and create the Buford Highway community. We have a responsibility to actively do something about this, because these issues affect us all and more negatively affect black people and Afro-Latinos in our communities....

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Letter: Reporter’s coverage accurately described a riot

Regarding the June 13 letter to the editor “The Reporter needs better representation, review of racially biased language”: Really? I saw lots of damage on Saturday, May 30. The AT&T store; Del Frisco’s Grille; Bistro Niko; Dior; Jimmy Choo; Ace Hardware. Looked like a riot to me. Geoff Nolan Buckhead Have something to say about topics in Reporter Newspapers communities? Send a letter to the editor at editor@reporternewspapers.net. Please include your name, city of residence and contact...

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Letter: The Reporter needs better representation, review of racially biased language

I’m writing to you in response to your article “In post-riot Buckhead, neighborhood leaders praise volunteerism, worry about more looting” (May 31). I saw this article shared on the Buckhead Community Improvement District’s Facebook page, and I had some concerns. A version of the word “rioting” is mentioned five times in the article (not including the headline), with some version of “looting” appearing three times. In the fourth paragraph, someone was finally quoted acknowledging “the extraordinarily difficult times for the African American community,” but there was no other mention of the purpose of the (largely peaceful) protests otherwise. (Please...

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Letter: An endorsement for Willis in Fulton County district attorney race

We deserve better. The race for Fulton County district attorney should be about the best person to lead this critically important position. Someone who will help keep us safe. Someone who has integrity, fairness and transparency. Paul Howard has had his chance. But he has failed us. Mr. Howard is under investigation by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation for potentially illegal conduct. He has three sexual harassment lawsuits pending against him. All while he continues to divide us through falsehoods and demagoguery. Enough is enough. It’s time for change. Fani Willis is that change. Fani is without doubt the...

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Letter: Column on pandemic safety self-policing was creepy

Dear “Around Town” columnist Joe Earle: I read your article in the Dunwoody reporter about safety and self-policing with the coronavirus. (Around Town: When safety comes down to politeness and self-policing,” June 3.) I thought your article came across with a bit of an elitist, creepy tone to it. An interesting observation of groupthink of the masses, in my view. Did it ever occur to you that not everyone believes everything that comes out of the media and responds by lining up, saluting, shutting down their life and covering their face with a mask? If you really believe everything...

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Letter: Will Sandy Springs increase equity and opportunity as social justice demands?

Editor’s note: This letter was sent to Sandy Springs Mayor Rusty Paul and members of the City Council following a June 6 protest where Paul spoke to the crowd. Thank you for taking the initiative on Saturday, June 6, to discuss issues of race, community and equity. These are important topics, timely, and ones that affect the very fabric of society. Two recent quotes attributed to you intrigued me. The first, “We have to begin the process of trying to eradicate racism from our community. We can’t do anything about the world, the country or the state of Georgia,...

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Worth Knowing: Sisters in arms find an online home in Georgia military women group

If you picture a typical military veteran, is your image male or female? If it’s male, you’re not alone. “When we tell people we’ve served, they think we’re the spouses of service members, not that we have served,” said retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Tanya Smith of Dunwoody. “When I first started making civilian friends and told them I had jumped out of airplanes, they would go, ‘What?’” said Carmen Morales of Brookhaven, the first woman in the Georgia Army National Guard to reach the rank of command sergeant major, the highest an enlisted soldier can achieve. These are...

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Commentary: Sandy Springs must confront America’s original sin of racism, mayor says

Editor’s Note: Sandy Springs Mayor Rusty Paul recently called for a citywide dialogue on racism and proposed changing the name of a street that may have been inspired by a Ku Klux Klan leader. In making his surprise call, Paul also cited his personal attempts to overcome racist thinking. The Reporter asked him to elaborate on those ideas.  With the arrival of COVID-19 and the reactions to the deaths of George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery, the past few months have been the most challenging of my public life. While we still struggle with the ongoing pandemic, we are simultaneously...

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