Category: Commentary

Letter: What one family has learned from the pandemic isolation

Our refrigerator died during the first week of the COVID-19 quarantine. You know, the refrigerator holding our double amount of groceries for our family of six. We have a small extra refrigerator in our garage which we transferred items to, but, true story, my daughter and son, being ever so helpful at the ages of 9 and 7, bumped into each other while transferring frozen blueberries and a glass jar of Frank’s RedHot Sauce. Glass shattered, the hot sauce made the scene more horrific than it actually was (thankfully no one was injured and certainly no blood to be...

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An editor’s note on our pandemic coverage

Dear Reporter readers, Like many of you, we at the Reporter are forced by this pandemic to work from home. Unlike some of you, we are at least still working. The shutdowns required to restrain the spread of the coronavirus are having a brutal impact on the local economy. We’re feeling your pain, too. The Reporter is a small, local business. We advertise other businesses. Our staff lives in the communities we cover, shopping locally and keeping money in the local economy. So we are all in this together. If you have a business to advertise, we’d appreciate your...

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Robin’s Nest: Waiting things out is OK – except for the missing Fitbit

If you are a regular reader of this column, you may know that my family is fortunate enough to have a cabin in the woods. It has been our cherished haven for about 20 years now, and it is here that I have sequestered myself for a few weeks, in the company of my extraordinarily patient and capable husband. We packed up the car with a few boxes of food, a bottle of wine (there was more where we were going), computers and power cords, notebooks and books (I’m analog), a sixpack of toilet paper, and an ample supply...

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Commentary: How you work may never be the same

2020 is not off to the start many of us expected. Anxiety is high and social distancing restricts much of what we rely on. But I have some good news: The way we work may never be the same. Recent efforts to fight the spread of the coronavirus means the number of people working from home—also known as “telecommuting” or “remote work”—has skyrocketed. This time last year, only about 11% of employees were telecommuting. Most people (76% , according to 2019 Atlanta Regional Commission commute data) were driving alone to work every day. Despite advances in technology, the 9-to-5...

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Letter: Stop the pandemic hoarders and gougers

I have now been to eight stores trying to find toilet paper, paper towels, hand sanitizer, alcohol and bleach. Every single store is out. When I went to the Sandy Springs Kroger in City Walk on Wednesday, March 11, at 7 p.m., at least five full aisles were empty. All the meat counters, except the small one with the expensive cuts like prime rib, were empty as well. The checkout lines started at each side wall and met in the middle at the check out lanes. I arrived at 7 p.m. and didn’t get home until 10, after a...

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Worth Knowing: In pandemic nightmare, acts of kindness abound

Almost overnight, our world has changed. But in the midst of our dystopian nightmare, examples of compassion are all around us – proof that that caring for one another is in our American DNA. Here are but a few examples. In Dunwoody, a group of moms, one of whom is Mayor Lynn Deutsch, have formed “Lunch-4-Our Bunch” to feed Dunwoody school children who might go hungry while not in school. Every Tuesday through the end of the month, the moms come together to make 1,000 bag lunches for distribution on Wednesdays outside at Malachi’s Storehouse at St. Patrick’s Episcopal...

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Life under quarantine: A Brookhaven city staff member and a reporter describe their experiences

Editor’s Note: Brookhaven City Hall abruptly shut down March 14 with the news that an employee tested positive for COVID-19. Mayor John Ernst said he was going into self-quarantine or self-monitoring, and urged anyone who had been at City Hall to do the same. That included Ann Marie Quill, the city’s communications manager, and Kevin C. Madigan, a freelance journalist who covered a City Council meeting for the Reporter. The following are their self-quarantine experiences in their own words.  Ann Marie Quill  Communications manager, city of Brookhaven I readily admit I wasn’t taking the news of the emerging threat...

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Letter: Local theaters seek help in coronavirus pandemic

Editor’s Note: Matthew Terrell, communications director for Dad’s Garage Theatre Company, penned this letter addressing how the community can help the companies bounce back once they reopen after the coronavirus pandemic. It has been signed by many theaters and companies in metro Atlanta, including in Dunwoody and Sandy Springs. To Our Local Theater Fans, Friends and Family: Right now is an unprecedented time for our community, and the local theater community will likely be hit especially hard. COVID-19 has caused a great deal of change, and we are all facing a tremendous amount of uncertainty. Currently, our leaders are...

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Commentary: Yes, we need to cancel large gatherings during coronavirus pandemic, expert says

Editor’s Note: Metro Atlanta is in the midst of a massive shutdown of major events and institutions in response to the new coronavirus and its COVID-19 pandemic disease. Many local governments and groups have struggled with deciding what and when to shut down. The Reporter asked an infectious disease expert for her opinion on how to handle public events at this stage. Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky is a recently retired professor of medicine at Emory University in its Division of Infectious Diseases and a consultant at the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the Division of Global Migration...

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Robin’s Nest: Burning through the tea kettle curse

Everyone has flaws and endearing peccadillos; mine is that I have an inexplicable tendency to burn water. It started with a Michael Graves tea kettle that was a gift from my uncle and looked like a piece of artwork, it was so brilliantly designed. It had a whistle shaped like a little red bird, so it was a perfect “Robin” kettle. It came to me when the kids were toddlers, and it met its demise one busy morning when it sat on the stove with its little Robin-bird whistling her heart out as I ignored it while tending to...

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Worth Knowing: A Sister of Mercy returns home to healthcare service

The Sisters of Mercy, founded in Ireland in 1831, were often called “walking nuns.” Instead of staying cloistered, they walked the streets, caring for the poor. Today they “walk” the world, including Atlanta, where in 1880 four Sisters of Mercy founded Atlanta’s first hospital, known for years as St. Joseph’s Hospital, currently Emory St. Joseph’s. Though the hospital is now secular, the Sisters of Mercy have long held leadership roles. One of them is Sister Jane Gerety, Ph.D., who was senior vice president at St. Joseph’s for 17 years (1992-2009) before leaving to serve as president of Salve Regina...

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Around Town: The pirates who bring Mardi Gras to Buckhead

Things started with David Moffett. He wanted a way to get to know his neighbors in the Club Forest subdivision better. Club Forest had several community clubs and social events through which women could meet, he said, but nothing similar for the men. “The women all knew each other, but none of the guys knew each other,” he said. Moffett grew up in Lake Charles, Louisiana. and went to Tulane, so he had a fondness for Mardi Gras, the traditional no-holds-barred party on the final day or days before Lent, a season of fasting for Christians. He thought Club...

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